Socio-Economic Vulnerability

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  • Socio-Economic Climate Vulnerability
  • Utilising existing methodologies
  • Generating socio-economic data
  • Decreasing the vulnerability of socio-economic sectors and ecological systems to natural climate variability through a more informed choice of policies, practices and technologies will, in many cases, reduce the long-term vulnerability of these systems to climate change. (IPCC 2000a)
  • Issues of poverty and inequality—or differential resource access are important determinants of vulnerability. But this is not a simple contrast between the developed and developing world.Different groups and places within countries differ in their ability to adapt and that divisions between rich and poor translate into differentials in people’s ability to adjust and in access to adjustments.
  • The interaction of climate change and the process of economic globalisation is resulting form of “double exposure,” from which a complex set of “winners and losers” is arising (O’Brien andLeichenko 2000).The concept of “double exposure” is important in regions that are characterised by economic marginalization and high-risk environments
  • Trends in human and societal conditions can be obtained from published and unpublished institutional and governmental databases
  • An in-depth analysis of human and societal trends requires awide array of data sources:• Economic data• Employment• Trade, imports, exports,• Processing and sale of natural/other resources.• Public health information• Census data – general demographics, education, family structure, employment, and migration patterns.• Election data – trends in governance and the implementation and enforcement of policies• Surveys and interviews with local people Source: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment, ACIA, 2004
  • To avoid wasting resources, start by looking for what is already onthe table before developing something totally new!
  • The vulnerability of tomorrows society to climate change will differ from the vulnerabilities of todays society.
  • Vulnerability “is not exclusively related to poverty” and that both the wealthy and the poor can be adversely affected by the impact of extreme weather events.
  • The “winners” and “losers” resulting from the interaction of the processes of climate change and globalisation may be different from the set of “winners” and “losers” which are identified when each of the two processes is examined independently.

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