Barriers to Adaptation

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  • Barriers to Adaptation
  • Typology of barriers,
  • Methods to assess and avoid/ overcome barriers
  • The inability of natural systems to adapt to the rate and magnitude of climate change
  • Technological, financial, cognitive and behavioural andsocial and cultural constraints.
  • Knowledge gaps and impediments to flows of knowledge and information relevant for adaptation decisions.
  • Goal barriers – Conflicts of interest pertain to conflicts between different goals. – e.g. the desire to establish residential houses near seas and lakes versus the goal of preventing such construction because of the risk of ocean rise and inundation.
  • Instrument barriers – Barriers related to the choice of instruments. – e.g. whether or not the municipality should expropriate land or make it voluntary for land- owners to sell land.
  • Organisational barriers – Pertain to how the climate adaptation effort is organised.
  • Uncertainty barriers – Pertain to various forms of knowledge deficit in analyzing climate vulnerability and how this may obstruct climate adaptation.
  • Avoid building infrastructure in areas at risk – conflicts between a climate resilient pattern of development and town development
  • Private economic interests
  • Political goals
  •  Risk of maladaptation – Creating transportation needs in conflict with mitigation policies –
  • The Importance of Uncertainty Barriers
  • Lack of administrative capacity,
  • Lack of administrative competence
  • A lack of political competence is a barrier to a comprehensive approach to climate adaptation,
  • First-degree barriers – Refers to whether or not the measure should be carried out at all. – A first-order barrier may include a lack of a given competence or skill.
  • Second-degree barriers – Pertain to the quality of the measure, i.e. that the measure is implemented, but the desired outcome was not achieved – A second-degree barrier could arise because the necessary competences or skills are not sufficiently developed or accessible.
  • Perceptions of barriers to adaptation also limit actions, even when capacities and resources toadapt are available.
  • Adaptation to climate change is multidimensional, encompassing various impacts, sectors, actions, and governance levels. It is closely linked to development processes, and involves a range of activities, actions, decisions, and attitudes that reflect existing social norms and processes
  • Successful adaptation can not take place if: the changes in climate are too great• the costs of adaptation are too high• both organisations/ institutions and the general public do not accept that impacts have beenaverted• responses do more harm than goodIs is vital therefore that• mitigation is seen as necessary to avoid limits• there is a cultural and institutional awareness of ‘expensive fixes’• decisions are legitimate and based on the best information available• all potential adaptation decisions are screened for maladaptation

 

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